Understanding the data behind Bitcoin Core

Your gripes about Dogecoin. What is not easy enough? What sucks about the dogecoin-qt client? How can we make our moms and dads able use Dogecoin?

Sometimes I wake up all sweaty in the night, thinking that dogecoin is not easy enough to pick up. I've had someone on dogemarket ask me to accept USD via PayPal because he couldn't get his wallet to sync. This is terrible. It means that your mom will also be intimidated by Dogecoin (of all things!!).
I've read this thread with complaints about the user-friendliness of Dogecoin. I totally agree. Read the linked thread too, it makes a lot of very good points. Dogecoin is not threatening, but it can still suck to set up and to use it. It also takes a lot of effort.
Please use this thread to collect your gripes with and possibly suggestions to the both dogecoin-qt client and the general Dogecoin experience (learning about it, getting a wallet, making transactions, getting Doge, finding ways to spend it etc).
I'll start with an unordered list off the top of my head:
DUMP YOUR SORROWS HERE. Then we can see what to do about them. THANK YOU~~
submitted by animeturtles to dogecoin [link] [comments]

The ultimate back-up plan: Your private key, stored in the block chain, encrypted

[edit: It is the ultimate back-up, but it doesn't mean it is the safest. I'm too tired to figure that out. I'm just explaining how to store a private key in the block chain, in case it is useful or can be made useful.]
I had that idea if someone is interested, though I guess people won't like it. It's a bit wild. We encrypt the key and put it in the block chain with a trick.
I'm not saying everyone should do this, but it could be useful to know it can be done.
If you trust encryption and your password more than back-ups or a third-party, then it could be nice. I'm no encryption expert but it should be strong enough.
"Instead of taking 1.3 quadrillion years, our magical cracking supercomputer would only need 328 trillion years." http://www.kotfu.net/2011/08/what-does-it-take-to-hack-aes/
If it's flawed or gets cracked after a billion years, I decline all responsibility. But you can be sneaky about it. I propose a sneaky trick at the end. It's a bit rough on the edges and crazy but I'll put it out there. If people like it, there are always ways to streamline.
Anyway, you can't memorize the key as you can memorize a password. It's true you can put it on paper; then lose the paper. You can encrypt it and keep it on hard drive, then lose the hard drive. Or on a service, and lose the service. The block chain though, is going to stay around as long as you need the key. So I suggest this whole alternative.
You can still put the information on paper if you want. But now, just your memory is enough. Just the password.
The drawback is the infinitesimal odd of someone finding out and spending a lot of years and resources on brute-forcing. I'm not sure what would be the odds of success. Just make it so decades of computing resource cost more than what's inside.
Now I'll explain how to do it from A to Z, for the few interested.
Plan: 0) Vanity 1) Get the key 2) Encrypt the key 3) Put the key in the block chain 4) Retrieval 5) Conclusion
0) Optional: Vanity I recommend a vanity address (choosing the first part of the address). So if worst comes to worst, you find it from memory in the block chain. And also, it's kinda neato. How-to: first, download VanityGen, direct/wiki. Extract it, then Open a console window at the location with shift-right click in the folder, if you have vista/7/8. Then type "vanitygen 1something" in it. It has to start with 1. If it's too long it'll take a lot of time. Ctrl-C to cancel if it's too long. Faster with GPU: oclvanitygen -D 0:0 1something (maybe broken atm) When you have the key, type "importprivkey mykey" in Help->Debug->Console of bitcoin-qt, to add it. Result of this optional step: A beautiful address which can be retrieved from memory if needed (after it has been seen in the block chain with a transaction)
1) Get the key - Download open source Pywallet: direct/profile - Extract pywallet.py somewhere. Shift-right click in the folder and "open a console window" - In the console, type: pywallet --dumpwallet dump.txt If your wallet is encrypted, then add --passphrase=PASSPHRASE Now you find the key in dump.txt. (note: it reads the wallet at C:\Users\x\Bitcoin) Result of this step: the private key; it looks like 51 characters starting with the number 5. (To delete dump.txt, you can use a software so it can't be recovered from HDD, like Recuva it seems)
2) Encrypt the key - Choose an algorithm. Personally, I pick AES-256. - Download a trustworthy program to encrypt text with the algorithm. Here are two with GUI I found. It's open source but I didn't check it, so it's not 100% safe: http://sourceforge.net/projects/textcrypt/ https://code.google.com/p/immediatecrypt/downloads/list They're both jar files. Maybe you can click them. Personally I have to go in the console; I'm so tired of that coffee cup. "C:\Program Files (x86)\Java\jre7\bin\java.exe" -jar ImmediateCrypt.jar. It gave me an error though. Not the other. Maybe someone can suggest better. - Choose a good password. It's all about the password (and the software). AES is weak with weak password. And crazy strong with a good password. This is not like websites with protection against brute-force. People can brute-force fully if they find out. I like psycho-pass method which is about a pattern on the keyboard instead of semantics. Side Info: http://www.jmir.org/2012/1/e10/ http://www.jmir.org/2013/8/e161/ Or a passphrase if you want. Here is a nice table with password entropy: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Password_strength#Random_passwords Below 64 bits of entropy, it's too unsafe, it's too weak. We need 128 bits or above, as far as I know. That is 25 random alphanumeric. If you're feeling paranoid, 256 bits. You can check entropy of password roughly here: http://rumkin.com/tools/password/passchk.php Remember it is not like websites. There is no "Forgot password?" button. Memorize it permanently; and maybe write it down in your favorite book just in case, I don't know. Result of this step: the encrypted key. It doesn't matter what it looks like as long as it takes you back to the key when you click "Decrypt". (on a different software, preferably)
3) Put the key in the block chain It works by sending some minimum amount to fake addresses, with data encoded in the addresses. Can't try this part because I don't have bitcoins. :[ Only a wallet! If some liked the guide particularly: 1thxd4KJLhBMcfCYaVKYMA8Atv3Dfx9hb :3 I'll follow the method of this great article: http://www.righto.com/2014/02/ascii-bernanke-wikileaks-photographs.html (the blog is remarkable!) - We're supposed to split the encrypted key in chunks of 20 characters. Then convert from ASCII to hex. Last chunk we fill with extra zeros. I wrote a little javascript to do it all automatically! If you don't like it, find a software, or do it manually. Not tested much but seems to work for my test. I'll say how to know if it worked. Copy that: encrypted='';har=(encrypted.split ('').map(function(c){return c.charCodeAt(0).toString(16); }));ek="";har.forEach(function(c){ek+=c;});while(ek.length%40!=0)ek+='0';iEK=0;ek2='';while(ek.length>0){ek2+=ek.substr(iEK,iEK+40) + "\n";if(ek.length>=40)ek=ek.substr(40,ek.length-40);else ek='';};ek2;
Check eventual comments to know if it's a hack/broken mess.
I don't do much Javascript, or much anything. Paste the whole thing in the javascript console. To open the console: Chrome, Ctrl-Shift-J. Firefox, Ctrl-Shift-K. IE9, F12. Put your encrypted key between the '' right at the beginning, then enter.
This should display rows of 40-characters chunks of the encrypted key in hex format (numbers, and a to f). I have 6 chunks but it depends on encryption. It should give twice as much characters as the input except for last zeros, and follow this conversion table from Char to Hx column. If it doesn't, call the police. Or use some Ascii to Hex service.
Now we take these chunks one by one and use https://blockchain.info/q/hashtoaddress/the_hex_chunk to convert to BTC addresses.
Send spare money to each one (the strict minimum is suspect and it'd get found easily) in the right order (wait for 1 or 2 confirmations each time to be sure).
And we're done! The information is safe and cozy, in the block chain. Not safe from brute-forcing, but safe from ourselves; and that's safer, isn't it?
4) Retrieval
Alright, how do we go back from the addresses to the encrypted key? I can't try it myself, but apparently, according to the article: 1) Get the transaction ID on blockchain.info, by going to the wallet's profile 2) Go to http://blockexplorer.com/rawtx/your_transaction_id 3) There will be something like that: "out":[ { "value":"25.08603421", "scriptPubKey":"OP_DUP OP_HASH160 27a1f12771de5cc3b73941664b2537c15316be43 OP_EQUALVERIFY OP_CHECKSIG" } ]
And you need to translate the "27a1f12771de5cc3b73941664b2537c15316be43" part from hex to Unicode. The result should be the chunk of encrypted key, written in hex again. You put all the parts together in order, remove extra zeros. Then use a program to go back from hex bytes to ASCII. Maybe someone can do it or I'll put the javascript one of these days if people are interested; I don't think they'll be. Usually I'm serious and extensive but you can't imagine how tired I am these days, of everything. Anyway, you put that ASCII in the AES program with your password, you click Decrypt.
Then you have your private key.
If you do this, don't lose other back-ups until you have successfully retrieved the key, to know it works.
5) Conclusion I understand that there's a small chance that someone figures the transactions are data, reassembles the parts, has massive luck and breaks the crazy strong encryption with supercomputers and botnets in less than decades, or aliens hack your bitcoins with quantum computers, ect... But I don't know, that seems very unlikely to me; more unlikely than losing personal back-ups or third-parties being untrustworthy.
More importantly, it gives peace of mind of not having to manage back-up stuff. You can format your hard drive and burn your house down if you want without worrying about losing stuff; well, except the house. And maybe the wife. Or you go to prison 20 years, and it'll still be there. If some of you want to go to prison. I know of one.
Here's a complicated idea for the extra-extra-paranoid: You send just one letter by one letter of the encrypted key, into dozens of fake addresses, to which you send bitcoins you got from an exchange and not from the main wallet, and only you know the correct addresses/order with the data, because of a pattern in the other letters. For example, the 2nd letter of the 1st data part is the 1st letter of your password when it's hashed. The 3rd letter of the 2nd data part is the 2nd letter of your hashed password. Ect... And it's not true for the other parts. So you know the order, but not someone without the password. It can go like this for many parts, then maybe if you run out of letters you send through a different wallet. All other characters are misleading except the 1st one, or last one, being the key character. And you also send money to other fake wallets which are purely misleading. Even if a flaw in AES was found and it could be broken instantly, an attacker would have to find the correct combination even before the strong encryption brute-forcing, he can't even know if he has the right combination, and that can be a big number of combinations. You can do the math. It's exponential stuff, I think. That's something I just thought of quickly, and I don't know much about any of that. Someone can find better. (Maybe, or maybe not, there's something about the encryption output which makes it so we can find the order back without password, then we'd need some kind of trick to obfuscate the position or nature of key characters but I won't spend any more time on something likely to be wrong/uninteresting).
tl;dr: "It works by sending some minimum amount to fake addresses, with data encoded in the addresses. "
Point is, once we know we can store data in the block chain, there are plenty of ways to make it so we're never locked out from the main address.
Well, if you can remember the password.
I hope this was useful to someone!
Goodbye
submitted by yemethzi to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

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Export/Import Private Key NavCoin QT 4.0.3

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