Hardware Wallet - State-of-the-art security for crypto ...

Groestlcoin 6th Anniversary Release

Introduction

Dear Groestlers, it goes without saying that 2020 has been a difficult time for millions of people worldwide. The groestlcoin team would like to take this opportunity to wish everyone our best to everyone coping with the direct and indirect effects of COVID-19. Let it bring out the best in us all and show that collectively, we can conquer anything.
The centralised banks and our national governments are facing unprecedented times with interest rates worldwide dropping to record lows in places. Rest assured that this can only strengthen the fundamentals of all decentralised cryptocurrencies and the vision that was seeded with Satoshi's Bitcoin whitepaper over 10 years ago. Despite everything that has been thrown at us this year, the show must go on and the team will still progress and advance to continue the momentum that we have developed over the past 6 years.
In addition to this, we'd like to remind you all that this is Groestlcoin's 6th Birthday release! In terms of price there have been some crazy highs and lows over the years (with highs of around $2.60 and lows of $0.000077!), but in terms of value– Groestlcoin just keeps getting more valuable! In these uncertain times, one thing remains clear – Groestlcoin will keep going and keep innovating regardless. On with what has been worked on and completed over the past few months.

UPDATED - Groestlcoin Core 2.18.2

This is a major release of Groestlcoin Core with many protocol level improvements and code optimizations, featuring the technical equivalent of Bitcoin v0.18.2 but with Groestlcoin-specific patches. On a general level, most of what is new is a new 'Groestlcoin-wallet' tool which is now distributed alongside Groestlcoin Core's other executables.
NOTE: The 'Account' API has been removed from this version which was typically used in some tip bots. Please ensure you check the release notes from 2.17.2 for details on replacing this functionality.

How to Upgrade?

Windows
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), then run the installer.
OSX
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), run the dmg and drag Groestlcoin Core to Applications.
Ubuntu
http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=441.0

Other Linux

http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=97.0

Download

Download the Windows Installer (64 bit) here
Download the Windows Installer (32 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (32 bit) here
Download the OSX Installer here
Download the OSX binaries here
Download the Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Linux binaries (32 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (32 bit) here

Source

ALL NEW - Groestlcoin Moonshine iOS/Android Wallet

Built with React Native, Moonshine utilizes Electrum-GRS's JSON-RPC methods to interact with the Groestlcoin network.
GRS Moonshine's intended use is as a hot wallet. Meaning, your keys are only as safe as the device you install this wallet on. As with any hot wallet, please ensure that you keep only a small, responsible amount of Groestlcoin on it at any given time.

Features

Download

iOS
Android

Source

ALL NEW! – HODL GRS Android Wallet

HODL GRS connects directly to the Groestlcoin network using SPV mode and doesn't rely on servers that can be hacked or disabled.
HODL GRS utilizes AES hardware encryption, app sandboxing, and the latest security features to protect users from malware, browser security holes, and even physical theft. Private keys are stored only in the secure enclave of the user's phone, inaccessible to anyone other than the user.
Simplicity and ease-of-use is the core design principle of HODL GRS. A simple recovery phrase (which we call a Backup Recovery Key) is all that is needed to restore the user's wallet if they ever lose or replace their device. HODL GRS is deterministic, which means the user's balance and transaction history can be recovered just from the backup recovery key.

Features

Download

Main Release (Main Net)
Testnet Release

Source

ALL NEW! – GroestlcoinSeed Savior

Groestlcoin Seed Savior is a tool for recovering BIP39 seed phrases.
This tool is meant to help users with recovering a slightly incorrect Groestlcoin mnemonic phrase (AKA backup or seed). You can enter an existing BIP39 mnemonic and get derived addresses in various formats.
To find out if one of the suggested addresses is the right one, you can click on the suggested address to check the address' transaction history on a block explorer.

Features

Live Version (Not Recommended)

https://www.groestlcoin.org/recovery/

Download

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/mnemonic-recovery/archive/master.zip

Source

ALL NEW! – Vanity Search Vanity Address Generator

NOTE: NVidia GPU or any CPU only. AMD graphics cards will not work with this address generator.
VanitySearch is a command-line Segwit-capable vanity Groestlcoin address generator. Add unique flair when you tell people to send Groestlcoin. Alternatively, VanitySearch can be used to generate random addresses offline.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic addresses generated by regular groestlcoin clients, then VanitySearch is the right choice for you to create a more personalized address.
VanitySearch is a groestlcoin address prefix finder. If you want to generate safe private keys, use the -s option to enter your passphrase which will be used for generating a base key as for BIP38 standard (VanitySearch.exe -s "My PassPhrase" FXPref). You can also use VanitySearch.exe -ps "My PassPhrase" which will add a crypto secure seed to your passphrase.
VanitySearch may not compute a good grid size for your GPU, so try different values using -g option in order to get the best performances. If you want to use GPUs and CPUs together, you may have best performances by keeping one CPU core for handling GPU(s)/CPU exchanges (use -t option to set the number of CPU threads).

Features

Usage

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/VanitySearch#usage

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020

Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020 is a windows app built from the ground-up and makes it easier than ever before to create your very own bespoke bech32 address(es) when whilst not connected to the internet.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic bech32 addresses generated by regular Groestlcoin clients, then Groestlcoin EasyVanity2020 is the right choice for you to create a more personalised bech32 address. This 2020 version uses the new VanitySearch to generate not only legacy addresses (F prefix) but also Bech32 addresses (grs1 prefix).

Features

Download

Source

Remastered! – Groestlcoin WPF Desktop Wallet (v2.19.0.18)

Groestlcoin WPF is an alternative full node client with optional lightweight 'thin-client' mode based on WPF. Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) is one of Microsoft's latest approaches to a GUI framework, used with the .NET framework. Its main advantages over the original Groestlcoin client include support for exporting blockchain.dat and including a lite wallet mode.
This wallet was previously deprecated but has been brought back to life with modern standards.

Features

Remastered Improvements

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – BIP39 Key Tool

Groestlcoin BIP39 Key Tool is a GUI interface for generating Groestlcoin public and private keys. It is a standalone tool which can be used offline.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux :
 pip3 install -r requirements.txt python3 bip39\_gui.py 

Source

ALL NEW! – Electrum Personal Server

Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server aims to make using Electrum Groestlcoin wallet more secure and more private. It makes it easy to connect your Electrum-GRS wallet to your own full node.
It is an implementation of the Electrum-grs server protocol which fulfils the specific need of using the Electrum-grs wallet backed by a full node, but without the heavyweight server backend, for a single user. It allows the user to benefit from all Groestlcoin Core's resource-saving features like pruning, blocks only and disabled txindex. All Electrum-GRS's feature-richness like hardware wallet integration, multi-signature wallets, offline signing, seed recovery phrases, coin control and so on can still be used, but connected only to the user's own full node.
Full node wallets are important in Groestlcoin because they are a big part of what makes the system be trust-less. No longer do people have to trust a financial institution like a bank or PayPal, they can run software on their own computers. If Groestlcoin is digital gold, then a full node wallet is your own personal goldsmith who checks for you that received payments are genuine.
Full node wallets are also important for privacy. Using Electrum-GRS under default configuration requires it to send (hashes of) all your Groestlcoin addresses to some server. That server can then easily spy on your transactions. Full node wallets like Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server would download the entire blockchain and scan it for the user's own addresses, and therefore don't reveal to anyone else which Groestlcoin addresses they are interested in.
Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can also broadcast transactions through Tor which improves privacy by resisting traffic analysis for broadcasted transactions which can link the IP address of the user to the transaction. If enabled this would happen transparently whenever the user simply clicks "Send" on a transaction in Electrum-grs wallet.
Note: Currently Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can only accept one connection at a time.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux / OSX (Instructions)

Source

UPDATED – Android Wallet 7.38.1 - Main Net + Test Net

The app allows you to send and receive Groestlcoin on your device using QR codes and URI links.
When using this app, please back up your wallet and email them to yourself! This will save your wallet in a password protected file. Then your coins can be retrieved even if you lose your phone.

Changes

Download

Main Net
Main Net (FDroid)
Test Net

Source

UPDATED – Groestlcoin Sentinel 3.5.06 (Android)

Groestlcoin Sentinel is a great solution for anyone who wants the convenience and utility of a hot wallet for receiving payments directly into their cold storage (or hardware wallets).
Sentinel accepts XPUB's, YPUB'S, ZPUB's and individual Groestlcoin address. Once added you will be able to view balances, view transactions, and (in the case of XPUB's, YPUB's and ZPUB's) deterministically generate addresses for that wallet.
Groestlcoin Sentinel is a fork of Groestlcoin Samourai Wallet with all spending and transaction building code removed.

Changes

Download

Source

UPDATED – P2Pool Test Net

Changes

Download

Pre-Hosted Testnet P2Pool is available via http://testp2pool.groestlcoin.org:21330/static/

Source

submitted by Yokomoko_Saleen to groestlcoin [link] [comments]

(Updated) [Staking] Reddcoin Core client GUI wallet on a Raspberry Pi Model 3B

Intro

This thread is an update to my first Reddcoin staking tutorial that was written 7 months ago.
 
The reason for the update
My Reddcoin Core software crashed and became unusable. My Raspberry Pi 3B would lag and freeze, I couldn't stake anymore.
 
Instead of just redoing everything the same way, I wanted to see if I could improve on 3 points:
 
The updates
 
If you would like to tip me
Writing a tutorial like this takes time and effort; tips are appreciated. My Reddcoin address: RqvdnNX5MTam855Y2Vudv7yVgtXdcYaQAW.
     

Overview

 

Steps

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     

Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Snr5e8bzftI
This video shows how long it takes to start Reddcoin Core.   TL;DR:
     

Extra

Backup
Backup your wallet to prevent losing the RDDs in your wallet! There are two methods to backup, do both. Make new backups if you create a new receiving address!
 
 
   
Boot with only 1 USB drive plugged in:
Make sure only the USB drive (with the swap partition and data partition) is plugged in when you boot up your Raspberry Pi. This to make sure the swap partition (/dev/sda1) is recognized correctly.   If you boot up with multiple USB drives, Lubuntu might see the USB drive with the swap partition as the second drive (instead of the first drive), and ignore the 2 GB swap partition. If this happens, starting Reddcoin can render the Raspberry Pi unresponsive.
   
Connection issues If you have issues syncing the blockchain because you have 0 network connections, please follow the instructions in this thread.
   
Start Reddcoin Core easier
Run a shell script (.sh file), so you can start Reddcoin just by double clicking on an icon on your Desktop.
   
Minimization options
Adjust minimization options, so you can safely press on the X button (the close/exit button on the upper right corner).
   
RealVNC VNC Viewer (client) and VNC Connect (server): To remote connect to the Raspberry Pi, I use VNC Viewer ad VNC Connect from RealVNC.
 
   
Chromium as browser: The updates break Firefox, the browser crashes when you try to run it. Install another browser, Chromium, to solve this issue.
   
Updates / Upgrades
If Software Updater shows up and tells you that there is updated software available, do not install the updates using Software Updater. Use LXTerminal to update Lubuntu.  
     

Credits:

   
Credits in previous tutorial:
submitted by Yavuz_Selim to reddCoin [link] [comments]

How To Use Coin Control & Stake More With 'PoS' DEAL Coins

How To Use Coin Control & Stake More With 'PoS' DEAL Coins
When you are using Proof of Stake (PoS) coins, active coin control is essential to ensuring that you maximize your PoS rewards. If you do not use coin control you may benefit less from the compounding of your rewards, and you may lose more rewards than necessary when you make a payment from your wallet.
Exactly how much difference this makes will depend on the specifications of the coin itself, and what transactions you make. It is particularly important for coins such as IdealCash, in which small and medium-sized holders must wait a long time between each time they stake and get a reward.
This presents a manual method of coin control for users of Qt wallets!
Why You Need to Use Coin Control
As I already stated, small and medium-sized IdealCash holders must wait a long time before they stake. When you do finally get to stake some coins, you do not get the interest due on your whole balance; instead, one of the payments you have received is selected and you earn the rewards due on that amount. The rest of your interest is not lost, it keeps building up and you get it later. But what this means is that if you receive a single payment for 10,000 coins, for example, you will earn more compound interest than if you receive 10 payments for 1,000 coins, even though your balance is the same. This is because in both cases you will wait the same amount of time before getting your first reward, but in the first instance you will receive all of your interest at once, whereas in the second example you will receive only 10% as much on your first stake. Because you can earn PoS rewards on your PoS rewards (compounding) that mean you will eventually end up with more money in the first example when you got a single payment than you would in the second example where you got 10 payments that added up to the same amount.
In the example above you could easily fix this without getting into any advanced techniques simply by using your wallet in the ordinary way to send yourself 10,000 coins. By doing this you would combine all of the outputs – all 10 of the 1,000 IdealCash payments – into a single output. But sometimes things can be a little more complicated. For example, let's say you receive a single payment of 10,000 coins, and leave it in your wallet to stake. After 8 weeks you still haven’t earned your first reward, but have built up a nice bit of ‘interest owed’ on these coins. You now receive those 10 payments for 1,000 each we looked at before. When you spend any coins in your wallet, you lose the unpaid rewards owed to you for staking them. So in this example, you would want to send a 10,000 IdealCash payment to yourself using these 10 new payments. But if you simply use the wallet as normal to send a payment to yourself it will probably not do this – it will use the 10,000 you got in your first deposit, destroying your earned rewards and doing nothing to consolidate the smaller payments. To do this, you need to be able to specify which outputs (which payments received) you want to use to create your transaction; that is what I am going to show you how to accomplish in this guide.
Coin control can also be useful when sending payments from your wallet. By specifying which outputs to use in order to make a payment you can ensure that you are not losing rewards unnecessarily. Please be aware, however, that when sending payments to somebody else you will probably need to send yourself change because each output is used entirely in each transaction. I will explain this properly later on in the guide, but for now just be aware that if you don’t do this you may lose some of your coins.
Manual Coin Control Using the Qt Wallet Console
Manual coin control requires you to use the console rather than the GUI. That means instead of just selecting options from menus, you have to manually type commands. These commands must be precise and use the correct grammar or they won’t work, so please read the instructions carefully and check that you have typed each command correctly before hitting enter.
To open a console window you just need to click ‘Help’ from the navigation menu of your wallet, then select ‘Debug Window’. This will open up a new window with two tabs: click ‘console’ to get to the tab that we are going to use here.
Step One: List Unspent Outputs In your console window type “listunspent” (without the quotation marks) and hit enter. This will give you a list of all the outputs of previous transactions which belong to you, or in more plain language, all of the payments that you have received.
Each one will appear between curly brackets and should look something like this:
{
"txid" : "a long list of random looking characters should be here",
"vout" : "this should be a number",
"address" : "this is the IdealCash address belonging to you that these coins where sent to",
"account" : "",
"scriptPubKey" : "another long list of random looking characters",
"amount" : "the number of coins you received",
"confirmations" : "the number of confirmations for this transaction"
}
You can use this list to select the outputs you want to use to make a payment. For example, IdealCash owners may want to select smaller and newer outputs (newer outputs will have fewer confirmations) and leave any older and larger ones.
When you have chosen which ones you want to use, make a note of the exact “amount” for each one. If you have received coins with more than one address then you will also need a list of each address that appears in one of the outputs you are going to use.
Once you have made a note of these things separately, we only need the “txid”, “vout” and “scriptPubKey” to put into the next step. You may like to copy and paste each one into a text editor and then delete every line apart from those three, to leave something like this:
{
"txid" : "a long list of random looking characters should be here",
"vout" : "this should be a number",
"scriptPubKey" : "another long list of random looking characters"
}
Notice that I have removed the comma from the end of the “scriptPubKey” line. Commas must always be included at the end of each line, apart from the last one. This is one of those annoying grammar things that you have to get right (and which I personally mess up more often than not). Don’t worry too much, if you get this kind of thing wrong you won’t lose any coins, it just won’t accept the command. Also please note that if you are not a programmer then you officially will be after you’ve done this, so feel free to be a bit proud of yourself.
Creating a Raw Transaction
The next step is to use the outputs we have selected to build the code for a complete transaction.
You should have a list of edited outputs from the last section. Put them, complete with brackets, into the command below:
createrawtransaction '[output1, output2]' '{"address you want to send coins to" : number of coins to send}' The number of coins you are sending must be exactly equal to total of all the outputs you have used minus the transaction fee (0.01). It is very important that you get this right as you could lose coins if you make a mistake here. For example, if you have one output with an amount of 1,000 and another with an amount of 2,000 then you must send 2999.99 coins (1000+2000-0.01). If you were to make a mistake and send just 2,000 coins, then you would end up paying a fee of 1,000 coins that you would never see again.
To give you an idea of what this should look you can see an example of a raw bitcoin transaction taken from this Reddit thread below:
createrawtransaction '[{"txid":"c7e5e03d2ab5458819eedec46d0ba38ca7a6525e38b493073277cf4a1550a348","vout":1,"scriptPubKey":"76a9144a06df74729aef1dce5e4641960da3a439d2460b88ac"},
{"txid":"c7e5e03d2ab5458819eedec46d0ba38ca7a6525e38b493073277cf4a1550a348","vout":0,"scriptPubKey":"76a914f88262828f5e64b454249e4c45ddb6071a2ab0a988ac"}]'
'{"Dty3qVvYyggQJnYfaXupbHRAPVhUxr1vso":0.17543376,"DwzkF4gP1xRoFKA4YvJpNFR9qvYzaWrFaE":0.17543375}'
IdealCash and most other altcoins will use the exact same format. In this example you can hopefully see that two addresses are listed to send coins to, with an amount for each one and a comma between them. If you are manually creating a transaction to send coins to somebody else then you will probably need to do this, because you will probably need to select outputs which add up to more than the amount you want to send, and then send the change to yourself. For example, you may have outputs of 10 and 15, but you want to send 20 coins – so you need to send the remaining 5 to your own address, otherwise they will be added to the transaction fee and lost.
When you have pasted this command into the console and hit enter, if you have managed to get all the grammar right, then you will get a long list of random looking characters as a response. This is your ‘raw transaction hex code’. Copy this for use in the next step.
Signing Your Transaction
You now need to sign your transaction with the private keys of all addresses used in the outputs you chose earlier. You can find your private key for any address using the following console command:
dumpprivkey
Obviously, you should replace
with the public address you want to get the private key for. If you have encrypted your wallet then you will need to unlock it before doing this.
You can now sign your raw transaction using the following command:
signrawtransaction 'your hex code generated in the last step' '[output1, output2]' '["privatekeyone", "privatekeytwoifneeded"]'
The middle section with output1 and output2 should be exactly the same as you used in the last step when you created the raw transaction.
When you hit the enter button on that command you will get a new, signed hex code. Copy and paste that into the final command:
Sending Your Transaction
The last bit is easy:
sendrawtransaction 'your signed hex code' When you hit enter on that final command your transaction will be broadcast to the network and your console will reply with a transaction id. If you have used this to send coins to yourself in order to consolidate smaller payments for staking, then your wallet GUI should now show ‘payment to yourself -0.01’.
submitted by Tyler__Z to IdealCash [link] [comments]

Lore v2 QT on Raspberry Pi

Hello,
 
To follow up to mindphuk's excellent piece on building the headless client on Raspberry Pi (https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6gkjrw/wip_blackpi_a_stake_device_based_on_raspberry/), I thought if anyone was interested I'd show you how to get the full QT version running on the Pi on the Jessie with Pixel desktop. This works and has been soak tested for several days now on a standard Raspberry Pi 3. I have since added some coins and it stakes a handful of times a day.
 
Running staking Lore clients paves the way for some of the future use cases of BLK utilising the Bitcoin 0.12 (and newer) core tech, including colored coins. So I'm going to leave this one going indefinitely to kickstart the number of Lore clients staking. It's certainly not mandatory but it will be good in the longer term to have a nice distribution of Lore staking clients.
 
The cross-compile which lets you create binaries for multiple platforms didn't work for the QT version on the Pi, so there is more to do than just running the binary unfortunately, as below. There are folks working on some much cleaner solutions than this for the Pi, with a custom front end, and where you won't have to do any mucking about. That is coming soon. In the meantime, if you enjoy a fiddle with such things, here's how to get this QT client working on your Pi.
 
These instructions assume you are starting from scratch with a completely blank OS.
 
Download Jessie with Pixel from: http://downloads.raspberrypi.org/raspbian/images/raspbian-2017-07-05/2017-07-05-raspbian-jessie.zip
 
Note they have since (August 2017) released a version called 'Stretch' which does not work with this guide. I'll see if I can come up with something new for that at some point and link to it here when I have. In the meantime the guide should work with the Jessie image above.
 
Unzip the file and extract the .img file to burn it onto Fresh SD card to boot from (to be safe, use 16GB or larger), using a tool like win32diskimager or Etcher.
 
Assuming you have keyboard/mouse and monitor plugged into your pi, boot it up and the Jessie Desktop will show.
 
Before we do anything else, you should increase the default swap size on the pi, as compiling certain libraries can exhaust the RAM and get stuck otherwise. To do this, launch a Terminal window and type:
 
sudo nano /etc/dphys-swapfile 
 
and Change the CONF_SWAPSIZE from 100 to:
 
CONF_SWAPSIZE=1024 
 
Exit nano with control + x to write out the file.
 
Then, run the following to restart the swapfile manager:
 
sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile stop sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile start 
 
Now, launch the browser and download the Lore 2.12 binaries for ARM here: https://mega.nz/#!k2InxZhb!iaLhUPreA7LZqZ-Az-0StRBUshSJ82XjldPsvhGBBH4 (Version with fee fix from 6 September 2017)
 
(If you prefer to compile it yourself instead, it is possible by following the instructions in the original article by Mindphuk just taking into account this is the newer version of the Lore client than when that was written (https://github.com/janko33bd/bitcoin/releases) and the versions of Boost and the Berkeley DB need to be the same as below.)
 
Double click the zip and extract the Lore binary files. Yes, at the moment they are all called 'bitcoin', not 'blackcoin' or 'Lore' - this is because the code derives from a recent bitcoin core implementation so this has not yet been updated. You can place these wherever you like.
 
In the Terminal window, change directory to where you put the binaries, e.g.:
 
cd Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel chmod +x * 
 
That marks the binaries as executable.
 
Now, we need the Boost libraries installed for any of the Lore binaries to work. The project was done with Boost 1.62.0. Unfortunately the Jessie repository only goes up to 1.55, so we need to download and build 1.62 manually on the device.
wget https://sourceforge.net/projects/boost/files/boost/1.62.0/boost_1_62_0.tar.gz/download tar -xvzf download cd boost_1_62_0 sudo ./bootstrap.sh sudo ./b2 install 
 
(This will take almost 2 hours. Have a nice cup of tea and a sit down.)
 
When I came to run the binaries, I found they couldn't find Boost. Running this command fixes that:
sudo ldconfig 
 
Now we are going to install the packages which aren't already included in the default OS installation which the binaries need in order to run:
sudo apt-get install qrencode libprotobuf-dev libevent-pthreads-2.0-5 
 
Now we need to install the Berkeley Database version 6.2.23. This is the version Lore v2 uses. Bitcoin still uses 4.8 which is 10 years old! This doesn't take too long.
wget http://download.oracle.com/berkeley-db/db-6.2.23.tar.gz tar -xvzf db-6.2.23.tar.gz cd db-6.2.23/build_unix ../dist/configure --prefix=/usr --enable-compat185 --enable-dbm --disable-static --enable-cxx 
 
I find this next section of the Berkeley instructions worked better just switching to root, which can be fudged by running sudo su before the rest:
sudo su make make docdir=/usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 install chown -v -R root:root /usbin/db_* /usinclude/db{,_185,_cxx}.h /uslib/libdb*.{so,la} /usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 
 
Now we're going to go up a couple of directories to where the binaries were:
cd ../.. 
 
Then run the client!
./bitcoin-qt 
 
And there you have it. Should hopefully end up looking a bit like this: http://imgur.com/a/eEHGa
 
Using the Bootstrap can save a while syncing. Download it at: https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6b3imq/blackcoin_bootstrapdat_up_to_block_1631800
 
Place the bootstrap.dat file into the ~/.lore directory.
 
Run ./bitcoin-qt again, it will say 'Importing Blocks' rather than 'Synchronising with Network'. My pi sync'ed fully in about 5-6 hours.
 
If you want peace of mind that Lore will always start on bootup into the Jessie w/Pixel desktop (i.e. after a power cycle), then you need to create a .desktop file in the following place.
sudo nano ~/.config/autostart/Lore.desktop 
 
And in it, enter the following (tailoring the Exec line below to the whereabouts of your bitcoin-qt file):
[Desktop Entry] Name=Blackcoin Lore Comment=Mining without the waste Exec=/home/pi/Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel/bitcoin-qt Type=Application Encoding=UTF-8 Terminal=false Categories=None; 
 
Power usage and payback time
 
After a good while leaving it going by itself, the CPU load averages got down to almost zero, all of the time. Idling, the Pi uses a bit less than 3 watts. This means it would take two weeks to use one 1Kw/h of electricity.
 
If you pay e.g. 12.5 cents a unit, that's what you'd expect this to cost to run in a fortnight. That's around $0.25 a month or $3 a year. Green and cheap and helping to secure the BLK network. I paid for the year's worth of electricity in 2 days staking with 25k BLK. Makes mining look silly, huh? ;)
 
Securing your Pi
 
With staking, your wallet needs to be unlocked and as such, the keys to your wallet are on the device. In a clean and newly installed environment as described above, and if you don't allow others to use your device and there is no other software or nasties running on it, there is no real cause for concern. However, there are some basic security precautions you can take.
 
Firstly, if you have enabled SSH and are playing with your pi across your LAN (or worse, the Internet), you should immediately change the password for the default 'pi' user (which is preconfigured to be 'raspberry'). Simply log in as normal, then type:
 
passwd 
 
You'll be prompted to enter the old and the new passwords.
 
Security by default
 
Your Pi is likely, by default, to not be exposed to incoming connections from the outside world because your router is likely generating a private address range for your LAN (192.168.x.x or 10.0.x.x or 172.x.x.x) which means all incoming connections are effectively blocked at the router anyway unless you set up a 'port forward' record to allow packets arriving on certain ports to be forwarded to a specific internal IP address.
 
As for accessing your Pi across the internet, if you have set up a port forward, this likely has security ramifications. Even basic old fashioned protocols have proven in recent times to have uncaught flaws, so it's always advisable to lock down your device as much as possible, and even if you only plan to access the Pi over your LAN, install a firewall to configure this. I used one called ufw, because it's literally an uncomplicated firewall.
 
sudo apt-get install ufw sudo ufw allow from 192.168.0.0/16 to any port 22 sudo ufw --force enable 
 
This allows just port 22 (SSH) to be open on the Pi to any device on my LAN's subnet (192.168.0.x). You can change the above to a single IP address if paranoid, or add several lines, if you want to lock it down to your LAN and a specific external static IP address (e.g. a VPN service you use). To find out what subnet your router uses, just type:
 
ifconfig 
 
and you'll see on the interface you are using (either hard wired or wifi) the 192.168 or 10. or 172. prefix. Change the above rule so it matches the first two octets correctly (e.g. 10.0.0.0/16 if you're on a 10.0. address).
 
You may already use VNC to access your Pi's desktop across your LAN, this uses port 5900. Add a line like above to lock it down to an internal address. It's not a good idea to expose this port to the wider world because those connections are not encrypted and potentially could be subjected to a MITM attack.
 
You can query the status of the firewall like this:
ufw status 
 
And of course, try connecting remotely once you change the rules to see what works. You should consult the official documentation for further options: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UFW
 
Back up & Recovery
 
There are again many ways to tackle this so I'll just speak about my basic precautions in this regard. Don't take it as a be-all-and-end-all!
 
The wallet.dat file is the key file (literally) containing all the private/public keys and transactions. This can be found in:
 
~/.lore 
 
You can navigate there using Jessie w/Pixel's own file manager or in a terminal window (cd ~/.lore). You can copy this file or, if you'd rather keep a plain text file of all your public and private keys, use the 'dumpwallet' command in the console. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'dumpwallet myfilename' where myfilename is the file you want it to spit out with all your keys in it. This file will end up in the same place you launch bitcoin-qt from.
 
The instructions earlier on, when running Lore for the first time intentionally left out encrypting your wallet.dat file because in order for the wallet to stake upon startup, it needs to have a decrypted key already. This isn't perfect, but after a power cycle, it would never stake unless you left it decrypted. So the best practice here is as soon as the wallet.dat file has left your device, i.e. you copy it to a USB stick for example, put it in an encrypted folder or drive (or both).
 
In Windows, one way is to use Bitlocker drive encryption for the entire drive. You should follow the instructions here to encrypt your flash drive before your wallet.dat is on there, and don't forget the password!!
http://infosec.nmsu.edu/instructions-guides/how-to-enable-bitlocker-to-go-for-external-hard-drives-and-usb-flash-drives/
 
On the Mac, I use a software package called Concealer to encrypt files I store on the Mac itself: http://www.belightsoft.com/products/conceale   There are almost certainly free packages with similar functionality, I have just used that one for years.
 
Either way, if you want to just make sure your USB drive is encrypted, you can do so in one-click in Finder before you put the sensitive files on it: http://lifehacker.com/encrypt-a-usb-stick-in-finder-with-a-click-1594798016
 
Note that these disk encryption methods may mean having to access the USB stick on a PC or Mac in order to retrieve the files in the event of a disaster. Be aware this may mean exposing them to more security issues if your computer is in any way compromised or someone nefarious has access to your computer. There are more 'manual' ways of backing up and recovering, such as literally writing down private/public key pairs which this guide doesn't go into, but may suit you better if paranoid about your setup.
 
Recovery
 
The wallet.dat file has everything in it you need to recover your wallet, or if you used 'dumpwallet', the file you saved out has all the keys.
 
Wallet.dat method: Install Lore as normal then replace any auto-generated wallet.dat in ~/.lore directory with your backup. If a lot of time has elapsed and many transactions have occurred since your backup, launch lore with:
./bitcoin-qt -rescan 
 
And if that doesn't do the job, do a full reindex of the blockchain:
 
./bitcoin-qt -reindex 
 
If you used the dumpwallet command, install Lore then place the file containing all the keys that you saved out in the same directory as bitcoin-qt. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'importwallet myfilename' where myfilename is that file containing all the keys. The wallet should automatically rescan for transactions at that point and you should be good to go.
 
There are a million ways to do effective security and disaster recovery, but I hope this shows you a couple of basic precautionary ways. There are discussions about better ways to stake without compromising too much security which are happening all the time and developments in this regard will happen in time.
 
In the meantime, feel free to comment with your best practices.
 
submitted by patcrypt to blackcoin [link] [comments]

[Guide] How to transfer your wallet from your computer to android.

I got tired of waiting and waiting for the whole blockchain to sync so I decided to move my dogecoins to my phone since the app does not need to download the whole chain. (Luckily there is a bounty for a electrum equivalent that will hopefully arrive soon.)
It is much much easier if you just transfer some funds to a new address on your android phone, but this tutorial is for those people like me who can't even get the dogecoin app to sync.
Surprisingly the whole process was very simple. Don't be put off by all the text or all the talk about security. I just want things to be accessible to beginners and to practice good habits. Root is not required.
Note: I am assuming you are using the official dogecoin-qt app and the Dogecoin Wallet app by langerhans.
Disclaimer: This will involve having your private key stored in plaintext. Proceed with caution and treat that file like you would a password. Do not share your private key with anyone.

Getting your private keys

A wallet comprises of public keys and private keys. Public keys are the addresses that you share, you can only use them for viewing. Private keys let you actually make transfers and are what makes you the owner of the wallet. Today we will be transferring those private keys to your phone. They will still be present on your computer unless you delete them, so keep that in mind security-wise.
You will have to replace everything in '<>' with your own values.
  1. Open the desktop app
  2. Open the wallet console by going to: Help -> Debug Window -> Console
  3. If your wallet is locked with a password, you'll need to unlock it by typing: "walletpassphrase 120".
  4. Get the private key for an address by typing: "dumpprivkey "
  5. Save the private key to a file.
  6. Repeat this for each address that you want to transfer over.
Please think about how much dogecoins you want to transfer over. Brarsh:
Do you need that much? What if you lose your device? Just like only keeping a small amount of cash in your wallet and most safe in the bank, only carry what you could conceivably use for that time without access to your main wallet.

Creating a backup file

Next we need to create a backup file so that we can import our addresses into the android app. The android app uses the same format for its backup files as MultiBit (A popular bitcoin app). A typical file looks like the following:
# KEEP YOUR PRIVATE KEYS SAFE! Anyone who can read this can spend your Bitcoins. Kwmxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 2013-06-22T18:36:35Z L1Sxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 2013-05-04T22:47:32Z Kxwxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 2013-05-08T00:58:28Z 
What we want to do is put our private keys in the following format: key date-of-address-creation, where the date is in the format YYYY-MM-DDTHH:MM:SSZ. Note the T and the Z. The android app needs the date so it knows how far back into the blockchain it needs to sync.
If you can't remember when you created the address, visit http://dogechain.info/address/YOURADDRESS and get the date of the earliest transaction. It says that the dates are approximate, so I'd just put 00:00:00 for the time.
You should now have a valid unencrypted backup of your wallet.

Importing the backup

  1. Transfer the backup to your android phone, placing it in your Download folder. It has to be put in the Download folder or else the dogecoin app won't find the backup. Make sure it has a name you'll remember later.
  2. Open the dogecoin app and click on: Back Up Keys -> Restore private keys. Click on the name of the backup and from the list that shows up, look for your backup, which should be unencrypted. Click Restore.
  3. Delete the backup in your Downloads folder. Remember, your private key is stored in plaintext in there, so it is important that you delete it. Delete the backup on your computer if it is there also.
  4. Wait for the app to sync completely. Your addresses will be added to the addresses that were already in the app, and your transactions should show up. If they do not, make sure that the date you put was correct and early enough.
  5. Go to Back up Keys > Back up private keys and create a backup. This time it will be encrypted with a password :). If you do not have a backup, you could lose all your coins if you lose your phone or the data on it.
  6. To the moon!

Terminology

I just got into dogecoin two days ago so correct me if any of this is wrong. Same thing with anything in the post :).
Blockchain/Dogechain: The blockchain is a ledger (record) of all the dogecoin transactions that have ever taken place. As of writing it is larger than 1GB in size. The blockchain is needed to find out how many funds you have in your wallet.
Wallet: A wallet is the digital equivalent of a real life wallet. It is where your money is tied to (It doesn't contain actual dogecoins, but someone else could explain that better than me). The wallet contains your addresses and your private keys, both which are needed to receive and send dogecoins respectively.

Sources

Getting your private key
Importing the key into the android app
submitted by cooper12 to dogecoin [link] [comments]

State of the Redd-Nation :: Mar 7, 2016

x-popsted (https://www.reddcointalk.org/topic/785/state-of-the-redd-nation-mar-7-2016)

Weekly Updates

Last Week

Welcome again to another weekly post and update on everything Reddcoin.
For Reddcoin, it has been quite a productive week. I have been able to build out a new release candidate (RC1d) containing all the fixes to the issues raised. This has now been distributed to most of the beta testers.
If you havent received your link yet, let me know (PM)
Outside of Reddcoin, it has been quite turmultuous over the past week particularly as the Bitcoin network has been dealing with high volumes. There has been an increase of small transactions causing blocks to fill and delaying some transactions from actually getting into a block.
Some of this discussion has been centered on the increasing fees of the network and it is becoming expensive to send transaction.

New Wallet - RC1d development update

Last week I spoke about hopefully being able to release a new candidate for for testnet. Time wise i was able to get ahead and managed to push a version out on Saturday 5 March 2016
The new build includes the following improvements
With this release there is an increase in the block version up from version 3 to version 4. Version 3 was originally created for PoSV. The increase to version 4 is required to handle the new DER signature validation.
What this means for the network is we will have some switchover logic. Effectively the following parameters are used
When this occurs version 3 blocks or lower will not be accepted on the network. This is not a hard fork that will suddenly happen, but rather timed so that everyone has time to get versions downloaded and tested (some exchanges and the like will need time to prepare).

Reddheads Website

Reddibrek has been very busy this last few weeks giving the reddheads.com website a freshen up. Here you can subscribe to the newsletter and read some of the pertinent articles being discussed.
If you havent subscribed already, please do to stay informed.

Network Fees

There has been lots of discussion in recent forums about network fees. I have even contributed to the following posting https://www.reddit.com/CryptoCurrency/comments/48zd7t/which_coin_has_the_cheapest_transaction_fees_atm/
In essence Reddcoin tries to keep fees to a reasonable level. We have 3 destinct areas in transactions that effect fees from the QT wallet
  1. Transactions 1RDD or less are considered spam and will attract 0.0001 RDD as a transaction fee. This is to discourage such low value transactions
  2. Transactions that are above 1RDD, and have a size that will cause the block to be < 250KB will be free. That is if there only a small number of inputs or outputs it will be free.
  3. If the transaction will cause the block to be > 250KB will attract increasing fees up to the limit of the block of 1MB
In the case of Reddcoin, fees go back into the network, and anyone with an open and staking wallet is entitled to recieve them and are included in the staking amount.

Contributions you can make

Some discussions have started on what the community can do to help contribute to Reddcoin, when you are not a programmer.
A few things do come to mind
These are just a few suggestions, there are plenty of things that could be improved.

In Closing

This week brings new challenges and I will be focusing back on the ReddID and Browser wallet features. The new build of wallet will be going through its paces this week and hopefully we have most technical issues wrapped up.
Keep on staking!
submitted by cryptognasher to reddCoin [link] [comments]

Facilitating Discussion of 0.9.0 FINAL of Bitcoin Core (aka Bitcoin QT)

To facilitate a detailed discussion of some of the finer points of this update, I added numbering to each bullet in release notes, and also posted it to RapGenius, where people can annotate it if they'd like.
I'm not a programmer, but I'm curious to hear what programmers and other people smarter than me have to say about all the new changes.
http://rapgenius.com/The-bitcoin-dev-team-bitcoin-090-final-lyrics
EDIT1 : Doh! Reddit detroyed all the formatting and now i'm on baby duty so can't fix it. EDIT 2: Nap time! Just fixed the formatting :)
---- 0.9.0 RELEASE NOTES ----
Part 1. RPC:
1.1 - New notion of 'conflicted' transactions, reported as confirmations: -1
1.2 - 'listreceivedbyaddress' now provides tx ids
1.3 - Add raw transaction hex to 'gettransaction' output
1.4 - Updated help and tests for 'getreceivedby(account|address)'
1.5 - In 'getblock', accept 2nd 'verbose' parameter, similar to getrawtransaction, but defaulting to 1 for backward compatibility
1.6 - Add 'verifychain', to verify chain database at runtime
1.7 - Add 'dumpwallet' and 'importwallet' RPCs
1.8 - 'keypoolrefill' gains optional size parameter
1.9 - Add 'getbestblockhash', to return tip of best chain
1.10 - Add 'chainwork' (the total work done by all blocks since the genesis block) to 'getblock' output
1.11 - Make RPC password resistant to timing attacks
1.12 - Clarify help messages and add examples
1.13 - Add 'getrawchangeaddress' call for raw transaction change destinations
1.14 - Reject insanely high fees by default in 'sendrawtransaction'
1.15 - Add RPC call 'decodescript' to decode a hex-encoded transaction script
1.16 - Make 'validateaddress' provide redeemScript
1.17 - Add 'getnetworkhashps' to get the calculated network hashrate
1.18 - New RPC 'ping' command to request ping, new 'pingtime' and 'pingwait' fields in 'getpeerinfo' output
1.19 - Adding new 'addrlocal' field to 'getpeerinfo' output
1.20 - Add verbose boolean to 'getrawmempool'
1.21 - Add rpc command 'getunconfirmedbalance' to obtain total unconfirmed balance
1.22 - Explicitly ensure that wallet is unlocked in importprivkey
1.23 - Add check for valid keys in importprivkey
Part 2. Command-line options:
2.1 - New option: -nospendzeroconfchange to never spend unconfirmed change outputs
2.2 - New option: -zapwallettxes to rebuild the wallet's transaction information
2.3 - Rename option '-tor' to '-onion' to better reflect what it does
2.4 - Add '-disablewallet' mode to let bitcoind run entirely without wallet (when built with wallet)
2.5 - Update default '-rpcsslciphers' to include TLSv1.2
2.6 - make '-logtimestamps' default on and rework help-message
2.7 - RPC client option: '-rpcwait', to wait for server start
2.8 - Remove '-logtodebugger'
2.9 - Allow -noserver with bitcoind
Part 3. Block-chain handling and storage:
3.1 - Update leveldb to 1.15
3.2 - Check for correct genesis (prevent cases where a datadir from the wrong network is accidentally loaded)
3.3 - Allow txindex to be removed and add a reindex dialog
3.4 - Log aborted block database rebuilds
3.5 - Store orphan blocks in serialized form, to save memory
3.6 - Limit the number of orphan blocks in memory to 750
3.7 - Fix non-standard disconnected transactions causing mempool orphans
3.8 - Add a new checkpoint at block 279,000
Part 4. Wallet:
4.1 - Bug fixes and new regression tests to correctly compute the balance of wallets containing double-spent (or mutated) transactions
4.2 - Store key creation time. Calculate whole-wallet birthday
4.3 - Optimize rescan to skip blocks prior to birthday
4.4 - Let user select wallet file with -wallet=foo.dat
4.5 - Consider generated coins mature at 101 instead of 120 blocks
4.6 - Improve wallet load time
4.7 - Don't count txins for priority to encourage sweeping
4.8 - Don't create empty transactions when reading a corrupted wallet
4.9 - Fix rescan to start from beginning after importprivkey
4.10 - Only create signatures with low S values
Part 5. Mining:
5.1 - Increase default -blockmaxsize/prioritysize to 750K/50K
5.2 - 'getblocktemplate' does not require a key to create a block template
5.3 - Mining code fee policy now matches relay fee policy
Part 6. Protocol and network:
6.1 - Drop the fee required to relay a transaction to 0.01mBTC per kilobyte
6.2 - Send tx relay flag with version
6.3 - New 'reject' P2P message (BIP 0061, see https://gist.github.com/gavinandresen/7079034 for draft)
6.4 - Dump addresses every 15 minutes instead of 10 seconds
6.5 - Relay OP_RETURN data TxOut as standard transaction type
6.6 - Remove CENT-output free transaction rule when relaying
6.7 - Lower maximum size for free transaction creation
6.8 - Send multiple inv messages if mempool.size > MAX_INV_SZ
6.9 - Split MIN_PROTO_VERSION into INIT_PROTO_VERSION and MIN_PEER_PROTO_VERSION
6.10 - Do not treat fFromMe transaction differently when broadcasting
6.11 - Process received messages one at a time without sleeping between messages
6.12 - Improve logging of failed connections
6.13 - Bump protocol version to 70002
6.14 - Add some additional logging to give extra network insight
6.15 - Added new DNS seed from bitcoinstats.com
Part 7. Validation:
7.1 - Log reason for non-standard transaction rejection
7.2 - Prune provably-unspendable outputs, and adapt consistency check for it
7.3 - Detect any sufficiently long fork and add a warning
7.4 - Call the -alertnotify script when we see a long or invalid fork
7.5 - Fix multi-block reorg transaction resurrection
7.6 - Reject non-canonically-encoded serialization sizes
7.7 - Reject dust amounts during validation
7.8 - Accept nLockTime transactions that finalize in the next block
Part 8. Build system:
8.1 - Switch to autotools-based build system
8.2 - Build without wallet by passing --disable-wallet to configure, this removes the BerkeleyDB dependency
8.3 - Upgrade gitian dependencies (libpng, libz, libupnpc, boost, openssl) to more recent versions
8.4 - Windows 64-bit build support
8.5 - Solaris compatibility fixes
8.6 - Check integrity of gitian input source tarballs
8.7 - Enable full GCC Stack-smashing protection for all OSes
Part 9. GUI:
9.1 - Switch to Qt 5.2.0 for Windows build
9.2 - Add payment request (BIP 0070) support
9.3 - Improve options dialog
9.4 - Show transaction fee in new send confirmation dialog
9.5 - Add total balance in overview page
9.6 - Allow user to choose data directory on first start, when data directory ismissing, or when the -choosedatadir option is passed
9.7 - Save and restore window positions
9.8 - Add vout index to transaction id in transactions details dialog
9.9 - Add network traffic graph in debug window
9.10 - Add open URI dialog
9.11 - Add Coin Control Features
9.12 - Improve receive coins workflow: make the 'Receive' tab into a form to request payments, and move historical address list functionality to File menu
9.13 - Rebrand to Bitcoin Core
9.14 - Move initialization/shutdown to a thread. This prevents "Not responding" messages during startup. Also show a window during shutdown
9.15 - Don't regenerate autostart link on every client startup
9.16 - Show and store message of normal bitcoin:URI
9.17 - Fix richtext detection hang issue on very old Qt versions
9.18 - OS X: Make use of the 10.8+ user notification center to display Growl-like notifications
9.19 - OS X: Added NSHighResolutionCapable flag to Info.plist for better font rendering on Retina displays
9.20 - OS X: Fix bitcoin-qt startup crash when clicking dock icon
9.21 - Linux: Fix Gnome bitcoin: URI handler
Part 10. Miscellaneous:
10.1 - Add Linux script (contrib/qos/tc.sh) to limit outgoing bandwidth
10.2 - Add '-regtest' mode, similar to testnet but private with instant block generation with 'setgenerate' RPC
10.3 - Add 'linearize.py' script to contrib, for creating bootstrap.dat
10.4 - Add separate bitcoin-cli client
submitted by WhiteyFisk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin-QT 0.9 disponível para download

The Core Developers of Bitcoin released the 0.9.0 FINAL of Bitcoin Core (aka Bitcoin QT).
DOWNLOAD:
This is a Final Version, but its the same as 0.9.0rc3
Sources: https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/releases http://sourceforge.net/projects/bitcoin/files/Bitcoin/bitcoin-0.9.0/ https://bitcoin.org/bin/0.9.0/README.txt
Bitcoin Core version 0.9.0 is now available from:
https://bitcoin.org/bin/0.9.0/
This is a release candidate for a new major version. A major version brings both new features and bug fixes.
Please report bugs using the issue tracker at github:
https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/issues

How to Upgrade

If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), uninstall all earlier versions of Bitcoin, then run the installer (on Windows) or just copy over /Applications/Bitcoin-Qt (on Mac) or bitcoind/bitcoin-qt (on Linux).
If you are upgrading from version 0.7.2 or earlier, the first time you run 0.9.0 your blockchain files will be re-indexed, which will take anywhere from 30 minutes to several hours, depending on the speed of your machine.
On Windows, do not forget to uninstall all earlier versions of the Bitcoin client first, especially if you are switching to the 64-bit version.

Windows 64-bit installer

New in 0.9.0 is the Windows 64-bit version of the client. There have been frequent reports of users running out of virtual memory on 32-bit systems during the initial sync. Because of this it is recommended to install the 64-bit version if your system supports it.
NOTE: Release candidate 2 Windows binaries are not code-signed; use PGP and the SHA256SUMS.asc file to make sure your binaries are correct. In the final 0.9.0 release, Windows setup.exe binaries will be code-signed.

OSX 10.5 / 32-bit no longer supported

0.9.0 drops support for older Macs. The minimum requirements are now: * A 64-bit-capable CPU (see http://support.apple.com/kb/ht3696); * Mac OS 10.6 or later (see https://support.apple.com/kb/ht1633).

Downgrading warnings

The 'chainstate' for this release is not always compatible with previous releases, so if you run 0.9 and then decide to switch back to a 0.8.x release you might get a blockchain validation error when starting the old release (due to 'pruned outputs' being omitted from the index of unspent transaction outputs).
Running the old release with the -reindex option will rebuild the chainstate data structures and correct the problem.
Also, the first time you run a 0.8.x release on a 0.9 wallet it will rescan the blockchain for missing spent coins, which will take a long time (tens of minutes on a typical machine).

Rebranding to Bitcoin Core

To reduce confusion between Bitcoin-the-network and Bitcoin-the-software we have renamed the reference client to Bitcoin Core.

Autotools build system

For 0.9.0 we switched to an autotools-based build system instead of individual (q)makefiles.
Using the standard "./autogen.sh; ./configure; make" to build Bitcoin-Qt and bitcoind makes it easier for experienced open source developers to contribute to the project.
Be sure to check doc/build-*.md for your platform before building from source.

Bitcoin-cli

Another change in the 0.9 release is moving away from the bitcoind executable functioning both as a server and as a RPC client. The RPC client functionality ("tell the running bitcoin daemon to do THIS") was split into a separate executable, 'bitcoin-cli'. The RPC client code will eventually be removed from bitcoind, but will be kept for backwards compatibility for a release or two.

walletpassphrase RPC

The behavior of the walletpassphrase RPC when the wallet is already unlocked has changed between 0.8 and 0.9.
The 0.8 behavior of walletpassphrase is to fail when the wallet is already unlocked:
> walletpassphrase 1000 walletunlocktime = now + 1000 > walletpassphrase 10 Error: Wallet is already unlocked (old unlock time stays) 
The new behavior of walletpassphrase is to set a new unlock time overriding the old one:
> walletpassphrase 1000 walletunlocktime = now + 1000 > walletpassphrase 10 walletunlocktime = now + 10 (overriding the old unlock time) 

Transaction malleability-related fixes

This release contains a few fixes for transaction ID (TXID) malleability issues:

Transaction Fees

This release drops the default fee required to relay transactions across the network and for miners to consider the transaction in their blocks to 0.01mBTC per kilobyte.
Note that getting a transaction relayed across the network does NOT guarantee that the transaction will be accepted by a miner; by default, miners fill their blocks with 50 kilobytes of high-priority transactions, and then with 700 kilobytes of the highest-fee-per-kilobyte transactions.
The minimum relay/mining fee-per-kilobyte may be changed with the minrelaytxfee option. Note that previous releases incorrectly used the mintxfee setting to determine which low-priority transactions should be considered for inclusion in blocks.
The wallet code still uses a default fee for low-priority transactions of 0.1mBTC per kilobyte. During periods of heavy transaction volume, even this fee may not be enough to get transactions confirmed quickly; the mintxfee option may be used to override the default.

0.9.0 Release notes

RPC:
Command-line options:
Block-chain handling and storage:
Wallet:
Mining:
Protocol and network:
Validation:
Build system:
GUI:
submitted by allex2501 to BrasilBitcoin [link] [comments]

How to Update RAVENCOIN Core Wallet (QT) to v2.1  Windows 10 Ravencoin Paper Wallet: How to Create and Import Bitcoin Wallets: Core vs Multibit How to install Bitcoin Core Wallet and send Bitcoins Ravencoin: How Mine and Setup Your Wallet (Windows)

A wallet backup protects your bitcoins against computer or software failure. It may also help you retrieve your funds after your device was stolen or lost. There are generally 3 ways to backup a Bitcoin wallet. Different software supports different methods. Make sure you're familiar with your wallet before loading To reduce confusion between Bitcoin-the-network and Bitcoin-the-software we have renamed the reference client to Bitcoin Core. OP_RETURN and data in the block chain On OP_RETURN: There was been some confusion and misunderstanding in the community, regarding the OP_RETURN feature in 0.9 and data in the blockchain. Multi-wallet is enabled by using more than one -wallet argument when starting Bitcoin, either on the command line or in the Bitcoin config file. In Bitcoin-Qt, only the first wallet will be displayed and accessible for creating and signing transactions. GUI selectable multiple wallets will be supported in a future version. However, even in 0.15 ... Open Wallet browser based bitcoin wallet. Use the form below to open a wallet and begin using this service. Notice: Different email address and password combination will open different wallets, be careful when entering your details as lost accounts can not be recovered! Submit. Logout Welcome to your wallet, enjoy your stay! 0.00 BTC; Spend; History; Buy; Keys; Public Key Private key. Show ... A hardware wallet is a cryptocurrency wallet which stores the user's private keys (critical piece of information used to authorise outgoing transactions on the blockchain network) in a secure hardware device. The main principle behind hardware wallets is to provide full isolation between the private keys and your easy-to-hack computer or smartphone.

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How to Update RAVENCOIN Core Wallet (QT) to v2.1 Windows 10

In this tutorial we are going to get our private keys from the bitcoin core wallet. This only works when you created the bitcoin address in the same wallet. ... Bitcoin-QT wallet review - Duration: 8:53. Secure Your Wallet 5,151 views. 8:53 . What Is A Bitcoin Wallet? - The Best Explanation EVER - Duration: 4:06. The Cryptoverse 117,797 views. 4:06. Top ... Buy Bitcoin with your credit card here: https://goo.gl/m1pXxJ Secure your Bitcoin with the Ledger Nano S Hardware Wallet: https://goo.gl/o5RTbf Get Free Cyrpto Currencies Here (faucet): ... Standalone Bitcoin Offline Wallet Printer This is a demo of a protoype bitcoin paper wallet printer I have built. bitcoin bitcoin value bitcoin exchange rate... Syncing your Bitconnect QT wallet NEW updated 10/27/2018 - Duration: 20 ... How to Lower Bitcoin Fee and See Transaction Size in Bitcoin Core - Duration: 3:59. howtwos101 1,120 views. 3:59. How To ...

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